Approach

Summary

Licensing status

Publication and contact information

Assays & screens

Clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based genome-wide screening platform

In vitro studies suggest CRISPR could be used for large-scale genetic screens in mammalian cells. Pools of lentivirus expressing Cas9 nuclease, a single guide DNA and a selection marker were used to generate a library of knockout cells. In a CRISPR library targeting 18,080 genes, a negative selection screen identified genes required for melanoma cell survival, and a positive selection screen identified genes, including those not found through shRNA screening, whose knockout resulted in resistance to BRAF inhibition. In both haploid and diploid human leukemia cells, positive and negative selection screens with a CRISPR library targeting 7,114 genes also identified genes whose loss caused resistance to drug-induced cell death. Next steps include using the screens to identify new therapeutic targets.

SciBX 7(3); doi:10.1038/scibx.2014.98
Published online Jan. 23, 2014

Patent application filed for findings in first study; available for licensing

Patent and licensing status unavailable for findings in second study

Shalem, O. et al. Science;
published online Dec. 12, 2013;
doi:10.1126/science.1247005
Contact: Feng Zhang, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Mass.
e-mail:
zhang@broadinstitute.org

Wang, T. et al. Science;
published online Dec. 12, 2013;
doi:10.1126/science.1246981
Contact: Eric S. Lander, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Mass.
e-mail:
lander@broadinstitute.org
Contact: David M. Sabatini, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.
e-mail:
sabatini@wi.mit.edu