Indication

Target/marker/pathway

Summary

Licensing status

Publication and contact information

Neurology

Autism

Not applicable

Mouse studies suggest correcting GI barrier defects could help treat autism spectrum disorders. In a mouse model of autism that also displays GI barrier abnormalities, treatment with the commensal human bacteria Bacteroides fragilis decreased gut permeability compared with saline and improved communication and behavioral deficits and restored normal serum metabolite levels. In mice, 4-ethylphenylsulfate potassium salt, a serum metabolite upregulated in the autism model and downregulated by B. fragilis, induced behavioral abnormalities consistent with autism. Next steps could include testing the effects of commensal bacteria in other autism models.

SciBX 7(3); doi:10.1038/scibx.2014.95
Published online Jan. 23, 2014

Patent and licensing status unavailable

Hsiao, E.Y. et al. Cell;
published online Dec. 5, 2013;
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.11.024
Contact: Sarkis K. Mazmanian, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.
e-mail:
sarkis@caltech.edu
Contact: Paul H. Patterson,
same affiliation as above
e-mail:
php@caltech.edu
Contact: Elaine Y. Hsiao,
same affiliation as above
e-mail:
ehsiao@caltech.edu